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What’s Wrong with the Ducks?

ducklings

Do the waterfowl living around the lake look unhealthy? Does it appear that they have a limp neck which droops to one side? Are they trying to fly but can’t? Are they trying to move their wings, but can’t? The waterfowl may have of Avian Botulism, commonly referred to as Limberneck Disease.

Avian Botulism is a paralytic, usually fatal disease of wild and domestic birds resulting from the ingestion of a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium. This type of bacteria produces several toxins but only two, Types C and E cause avian mortality. Type C toxin is the most common and can be a recurring issue known to affect all waterfowl, including ducks, geese and swans. Pelicans, gulls, shorebirds, raptors, and upland birds are also susceptible, and places these Florida birds at high risk.

THE COMMON OUTBREAK AREAS

Outbreaks of avian botulism can occur anywhere in Florida’s aquatic environments because this bacterium is common in wetlands and pond and lake shorelines. The bacterium spore is resistant to heat and drying. In some instances the spores have been known to remain viable for years. This “disease environment” is typical of Florida’s warm water lakes and canals especially during the hot months from May through October.

THE CAUSES OF AVIAN BOTULISM

Important environmental factors that contribute to Avian Botulism outbreaks include:

  • Low and fluctuating water levels
  • Decomposition of rotting fish, bird and other carcasses
  • High air and water temperatures
  • An over-crowded waterfowl population

DISEASE CYCLE

When botulism toxin is produced, dead birds decompose their carcasses become hosts for maggots that ingest and accumulate the botulism toxin produced in the carcasses. New birds arriving to the area feed on the toxic maggots and in turn are affected with the toxin and die thereby renewing the botulism death cycle. Also, fish can ingest the maggots and endanger common Florida fish-eating birds such as cormorants, anhingas, ospreys and pelicans.

CONTROLLING AN OUTBREAK

The most effective method of stopping these devastating avian botulism outbreaks is the rapid removal of all animal carcasses. Therefore, a thorough survey of the waterway by an experienced lake management crew with the proper tools and equipment is necessary to locate, remove and dispose of carcasses responsibly both initially when the disease first starts and continuously until the outbreak ends.

Aquatic Systems loves the waterfowl on your lake as much as you do!

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